Ways to repurpose your old blog content
blogging, content marketing, SEO, social media

6 Awesome Ways to Rejuvenate Old Content on Your Blog

There is one thing that Google and its assorted trawling bots love, and that is fresh content. If that fresh content is also linked from established websites, then Google has every reason to believe the content is quite good, assumes it has some kudos, and will rank it higher.

This, of course, is brilliant good for the content creator, and the website where the content is housed. Fresh content is the key to this process – the oil that keeps the engine running if you like – and is critical in a healthy inbound marketing strategy.

But often, creating bespoke singular content is an expensive process. So how do you get the most out of new content?  Hopefully this blog will go some way to identifying new content opportunities from old or existing content:

 

1. Switch the format up

As an example – if you’ve run surveys of your clients or market then reformat them. Oh and tweak for SEO as you go. Here’s some options:

  • Video summary of the findings to YouTube
  • Press release
  • Segment the full report – show industry cuts
  • Social media sharing of research nuggets. Social Media B2B do this very well embedding tweetable nuggets into an article. Like this article on content marketing stats.
  • Create an infographic from the summary
  • More social media sharing and discussion
  • Micro poll your users as to if the results still stand true
  • Publish results from the micro poll

2. The Friday roundup / in depth piece

Give followers a lean-back post to digest on Saturday or Sunday. Branding Magazine sends out a summary listing of their hot posts of the previous five days. Good for those relaxing on a Saturday morning with bacon and coffee. In contrast to a round up – the economist has a lean back section for a more in depth read on existing topics and themes.

3. Get all analytical

Find out which of your posts were the most popular in terms of traffic from various search terms. Promote them on social media.  Rework those that are off target.

Use Topsy to compare trending hashtags, or trending phrases and really target your next article.

4. Think of your old posts

Continuing the analytics theme – give your old posts will little traffic a tweet or a share if there’s something relevant in the news related to that post. Use this one sparingly though as it could annoy your close followers. And tailor it to each audience!

If your blog is on WordPress, you may even want to consider the plugin Tweet Old Post which will automate it for you.

5. Newsjack

Your products or services might not be famous yet but helping out someone in a broadcasted bad situation can be powerful content. Oakley sent a new model of sunglasses to those leaving the Chilean mines a few years back – it was global news and everybody saw it. It gave others the chance to create loads of content around them.

It could also be a way to reassure your clients that this won’t happen to them – like password protection. A great example of newsjackking was Lastpass providing a tool to check if your LinkedIn password was stolen. They re-purpose this piece each and every time a new website is hacked or comes to the limelight for security breaches.

 

6. Croudsource an article from your comments area

I love when people point out an idea you’ve missed on a comments section from another article or blog. Use those ideas and expand on them in another post.

Your Turn

Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments section. I’d love to create another post!

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agilemarketing, content marketing, SEO, social media

5 sources of innovation for your digital marketing

Now as a digital marketer or online marketing specialist, there’s a lot of innovations I need to keep up with.

There are technical updates in the various fields of the role: SEO, SEM, social media, content marketing, PR, email marketing and mobile marketing that I need to monitor so that I’m optimising and measuring efforts correctly.

But beyond that, how can you keep a competitive advantage in the online space?

Can we look at different perspectives, emulating competitors, extrapolating on someone else’s technique? Here’s some options you might wish to explore.

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Reflecting. Still Sunday in NZ

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  1. I’m starting to think more seriously about my photography and one method I use to create new shots is to emulate a technique that someone has used on a totally different subject. Maybe there’s methods that you use in web development that could help your content marketing?
  2. Attend a conference but look outside your industry when choosing break out sessions. If you market to consumers throw a B2B presentation into your mix. Very rarely will a competitor share the big secret to their online marketing, but someone in a different industry might.
  3. Learn a language or switch continent. I google a topic in Spanish and Portuguese to see if there’s experts there that are doing things differently. Sure, most of the SEO and PPC innovation comes from the US, but there’s quite a few Chilean and Brazilian startups doing innovative stuff in the Mobile and location (checking into locations) space.
  4. Think about external sources for your content like your supplier or resellers. Ozone Coffee Roasters tell their suppliers back story very well. Discussing suppliers can often lead to great long tail SEO.
  5. In your A/B testing, do something counterintuitive occasionally. OK, I’m not saying do something that will alienate your customers completely, but try sending out a new article at 8pm instead of 8am, just to see…

These are some of the ways I innovate. What do you do to keep ahead?


Some thoughts on different perspectives and using tactics from other specialities or industries to spice things up.

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content marketing, SEO, social media, user experience

Rich Snippets and Open Source Architecture

Theres two topics for today’s post, and both on very different streams. The first, rich snippets, is the ability to tell search engines to display text and images, that you provide, in the manner you want, on search engine result pages (SERPs).

Hubspot wrote a great article on snippets earlier in the week. The article is robust and covers so I won’t go into too much detail. But in case you aren’t aware there are snippets that allow you to provide structured detail for:

  • Authors
  • businesses,
  • music,
  • videos,
  • products,
  • recipes
  • and events.

With my blog hosted on WordPress, I will need to explore how far I can take snippets, but Twitter does already recognise the first image and paragraphs of my post, displaying them in stream much like Facebook. Which is a reasonable first step.

Two benefits I can see from ensuring your snippets are in place and working are:

  1. You really get a chance to optimise and enhance your calls to action and distinguish your result. I for one would be more inclined to click on a well formatted link, even if it was mid way down the results page.
  2. You also get the chance to start feeding through your brand, corporate palatte and tie this to your site. Consistency between the author image in the SERPs, and tone of voice can’t help but improve the users experience.

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Priory park. #nofilter #spring

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The second edition of Sunday Session was recorded at Priory Park today. I shade from the wind beside the lake, looking across at the pavilion, a feature piece of modern architecture in Reigate.

Which vaguely leads me to the second topic today. UNStudio architects in the Netherlands have said in June they will re-form as an open source architecture studio.

Here’s the tweet which proved popular – perhaps as it is an innovative step for an industry that is still, like many, tightly holding onto IP and what they believe to be competitive advantage through knowledge.

I think this could be an exciting move for the studio, as they vow to make as much as possible of their processes and architecture open to the public and other architects.

It’s not too dissimilar to content marketing and sharing how to, or instructive guides like Hubspot has above. When UNStudio release what would be mainstream architecture fundamentals (say the design of a 3 bed townhouse) it frees them up to focus on innovation and differentiation. Rather than redrafting the same things constantly, to add a flurry at the end.

What’s more, unable to find a structure within their industry that they felt could innovate fast enough, they have looked to the startup scene and the likes of Square, Xero and Twitter. Tech companies using Agile project management.

While the process may not be truly agile they are letting the teams self select and focus in their strength among four topics in the new open source platform: sustainability, organisation, materials and parametrics.

It is definitely one I’ll be watching this year, and that I hope succeeds.

Listen along…

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content marketing, SEO, social media

Podcast: Sunday thoughts on online and offline cartels

Well this week I have come to the conclusion that I need more practice speaking.
As this blog progresses I have begun to feel quite confident in my ability to communicate thoughts and invoke interest from colleagues online.

At work I am confident that as a leader my direction and directions are understood and executed efficiently. What I would like to improve is my ability to improvise. To think and speak simultaneously.

To this end I’ve decided to take up Sunday podcasting. Short thoughts to start with, using Soundcloud on the go.

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Boom… Shhhhhhh.

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This first session, by the roaring waves at Shoreham Fort is probably pretty bad in terms of background noise and coherent chain of thought and expression. Hopefully I can improve incrementally as the weeks progress.

Having introduced what I’m doing. Here’s what sprung to mind down at the waters edge.

Cartels will emerge – playing to the strengths of their members

Remembering the phrase I’d heard earlier in the week, “A rising tide lifts all boats” I couldn’t help but feel we will see – in the coming years – industries and sectors banding together as cartels to rise together.

The cartel, being to some extent, less offensive to the masses than the monopoly that Facebook has on social or that Google has on search.

Competitors, could quite well become allies, as they strategically align their strengths and focus so as to leverage each others USP, rather than all trying to be reasonably good at everything.

In search terms this would mean aligning key phrases so there’s less overlap. For example: I’m optimised for Auckland B2B Agile Marketing, another colleague would be for Retail B2C and another for FMCG yet together we cover all facets of marketing in Auckland.

Where we are not an expert, we forward (and link) clients to our cartel members. Playing to their strengths.

Social sharing and blogging about the ability of others will also be the norm.

As industry cartels or networks form, online niche platforms and networks will grow to support cross selling and cross sharing of content.

One nod to this is the advent of blogger outreach platforms.

Chuck Kent interviewed Dino Dogan about Triberr (see video here) last week which I think is a first step in this direction. The platform connects bloggers with products to which they have a true natural affinity. Not just one they want swag from.

There is some way to come from this to cartels but I’ll be doing my best to push it forward.

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